Afghanistan’s retreat: 2.3 trillion the shame of U.S.

Billions of dollars left behind. About $2.3 trillion was borrowed to finance the war. In addition, the United States devoted itself to pay $2 trillion to Iraq and Afghanistan veterans…this is more than a U.S. debacle. ©Bulent Kilic AFP Getty Images
10/07/2021
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It has been two decades since the American troops toppled the supremacy of the Taliban and Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan.

The long war, which aimed at seizing power from militants, has displaced millions and caused thousands of deaths. The agreement between the United States government and the Taliban to leave Afghanistan has caused turmoil, creating unrest as the new group tries to suppress and defeat the Islamic State (IS) militants. The United States decision to withdraw from Afghanistan is an attempt to instigate diplomacy to allow the country to govern itself. However, the disparities between IS and Taliban threaten the restoration of normal operations and the nation’s development. 

The United States exit led to the evacuation of more than 120,000 people. The efforts to evacuate foreigners remaining in the country are underway, but the process faces significant threats from the IS group. However, governments, such as the British government, are creating schemes to enable former staff to relocate to their respective nations because many are still in Afghanistan.

Employees who worked for the United States and other countries involved in the two-decade war are at the risk of being tortured and killed since the Taliban and IS perceive them as traitors. A former interpreter from Afghanistan confirmed that about 400 Afghan special forces are hiding as they seek an escape to Britain since they were trained in the United Kingdom and worked for the British troops. 

afghanistan retreat General Mark Milley, chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, conceded in a stark admission that the US 'lost' the war in Afghanistan POOL GETTY IMAGES AFP
Afghanistan retreat General Mark Milley, chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, conceded in a stark admission that the US 'lost' the war in Afghanistan POOL GETTY IMAGES AFP

Recently, the Taliban announced new leaders in charge of the caretaker government. The group’s decision signifies that Afghanistan will continue to be ruled by dictators with no room for human rights or freedoms. The elected leaders are associated with varying terror events that left several people dead and others injured.

Even though the Taliban’s spokesperson said that the new interim cabinet would represent all Afghans, there are signs that the government is focusing on ruling while disregarding equality and human rights. For instance, the interim government lacks non-Taliban members indicating that the citizens will have to adhere to Taliban policies and rules since they will be unopposed. Democracy and equality should have started with forming a government with representatives from Taliban and non-Taliban parties. 

Violence remains evident in Afghanistan because of the clashes between the Taliban and the IS groups. Lately, on October 3, 2021, there was a bomb explosion in Kabul that left at least five people dead. The Taliban militants guarded the area near the mosque, but the security was infiltrated, portraying their incapability to maintain security.

Besides, the Taliban are oppressing women and using excessive force to break up their protests. Journalists who highlight the plight of women under the regime are beaten up and detained, signifying reporters’ oppression. The current clashes thwart efforts of the interim government to channel funds towards the provision of vital services, such as healthcare and food for the displaced. The country now depends on well-wishers and international organizations for relief. China is one of the nations that has offered to provide commodities, such as medicine, COVID-19 vaccines, and grains, worth 200 Yuan. 

Loss of lives, the distraction of property, and disruption of operations in Afghanistan during the 20-year war pose high costs to the United States. About $2.3 trillion was borrowed to finance the war. In addition, the United States devoted itself to pay $2 trillion to Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. The interest for the debt-financed is projected to reach $6.5 trillion by 2050. As a result, the American generations will bear the costs of paying for the war, whereas the money could help improve public services. Thus, the United States presence in Afghanistan has led to high expenses that the country will continue to bear for decades to come.    

                

References

https://www.cfr.org/timeline/us-war-afghanistan

https://news.sky.com/story/chartered-flight-carrying-westerners-lands-in-doha-after-leaving-kabul-12402696

https://news.sky.com/story/afghanistan-kabul-mosque-bomb-blast-leaves-a-number-of-civilians-dead-taliban-say-12424984

https://news.sky.com/story/afghanistan-who-are-terror-group-isis-k-12391419

https://apnews.com/article/middle-east-business-afghanistan-43d8f53b35e80ec18c130cd683e1a38f

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/09/01/how-much-did-war-afghanistan-cost-how-many-people-died/5669656001/

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-47391821

Kelvin Mwenda,

A freelancer with a passion for writing stories on different genres and occurrences across the globe. Holder of a Master’s degree in Business Administration and a Bachelor’s in Economics and Statistics.  

“Research is what I’m doing when I don’t know what I’m doing.”

3 Responses

    1. Great article. I wonder if Biden did all this on purpose to make the Taliban win and gain something in return.

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